Breakout Session Descriptions

Andragogy- Research and Implementation

Presenter: Dugger and McCoy (Mt Mercy University)
Offered: Session 3; Session 4
Andragogy is the study of teaching the adult learner taking into account four needs: (1). Adults tend to be more self-directed as a result of their maturity, (2) Adults possess personal history which serve as a resource for experiential learning, (3) Motivation of adults is directed to more socially relevant learning, and (4) Adult learners have interest in immediate application for problem-solving. Come to this session if you want to discuss making adjustments in your classroom to meet the needs of the adult learner.

Assessment in CTE Programs

Presenter: Scott Ocken and Jenny Foster (DMACC)
Offered: Session 2
This session will focus on development of easy to implement course level assessment activities, assessment reporting, and development of performance testing rubrics. The goal of this session is to make it easy to assess, report and improve your students' performace in class.

Assessments and more for the world language classroom

Presenter: Carrie Morris (DMACC)
Offered: Session 3; Session 4
Are you teaching a world language course for dual credit at DMACC? If so, please bring an oral assessment or rubric that you use, or your own ideas for one. If you hate giving an assessment that was given to you for which you had no input, here is your chance to get in on the ground floor! A rough outline of an oral assessment for FLS 241 and/or FLS 242 will hopefully be our final product!

Beware of the Information Overload! Teaching Students to Access, Evaluate, and Incorporate Information

Presenter: Andrew Neuendorf (DMACC)
Offered: Session 1
No skill is more critical for improving education and civic engagement than the ability to access, evaluate, and incorporate information. However, in our current age of distraction and information overload, it requires a sharp and critical eye to cut through the noise. This session will address strategies for teaching students how to apply critical thinking to their research projects.

Choosing the Right Ingredients for a Successful Interdisciplinary Research Project.

Presenter: Derek Lyons and Lydia Sinapova (Simpson College)
Offered: Session 1; Session 2; Session 3; Session 4
Interdisciplinary collaboration brings the best ingredients together to solve problems. Much like cooking a meal, the preparation is key to a successful collaborative project. We will present our experiences in supervising interdisciplinary, undergraduate reserch in DNA nanotechology. DNA nanotechnology projects primarily intergrate computer science and biochemsitry students and faculty to develop software for optimizing DNA sequences and operating automated hardware for the contruction of nanoscale structure made from DNA. We will whet your appetite with a description of the structure and organization of the projects undertaken by the students, as well as the assessment techiques utilized to gather data on improvements in student learning. The meat of this presentation will discuss several case studies over the past several years of interdisciplinary collaboration. Retrospective analysis from the faculty members involved and student feeback have provided a taste of the skills the students improved most upon. These case studies will describe how we choose the approriate format for grading the students' project, how to select topics, and how to ensure administrative and financial support of the faculty that supervise undergraduate research. If you are cooking up some interdisciplinary projects, learn from both our mistakes and succeses to ensure you have the recipe for success.

Complementary Instruction: Ideas for Learning Communities in the Composition Classroom

Presenter: Rachel Murdock (DMACC)
Offered: Session 3
Discussion of the possibilities of developing composition learning communities that complement majors.

Complementary Instruction: Including Public Speaking Elements in the Composition Classroom

Presenter: Rachel Murdock (DMACC)
Offered: Session 1; Session 2
This session will offer ideas for adding oral and visual elements to the classroom to composition instructors. The session will give composition/writing instructors some resources that will assist them in adding oral elements into the classroom, as well as, assist in assessing those elements. We will share ideas between attendees as well, including how the Speech Center at Ankeny can supplement their efforts to add orals elements into the composition classroom.

Creating Pecha Kucha presentations using Google Slides and Storyboard That

Presenter: Jeff Hughes (DMACC)
Offered: Session 2
Pecha Kuchapresentations were first used in Japan. They follow a 20x20 format using PowerPoint or Google Slides. This means that speakers must present succinctly because there are only twenty slides and each slide transitions every twenty seconds. I will show ways that I have used Pecha Kucha presentation projects with psychology and speech students. Additionally, I will demonstrate way to create graphic organizers on the Storyboard Thatweb app and show how to export the images to Google Slides an MS PowerPoint for lively and expedient classroom presentations.

Creativity through Constraint: Projects that Enliven and Challenge

Presenter: Sarah Brown-Wessling (Keynote)
Offered: Session 3
If you've found yourself asking, "How do I get my students to see beyond the surface? How do I get them to think?" you're part of a huge club of us who are constantly trying to help our students "get beyond." when we're learning more deeply, when we're deconstructing the processes of thinking, we're cultivating our strongest thinkers. In this workshop, we'll do a deep dive into some projects where students are challenged to exercise their deeper learning.

Cross-Pollination in the Class Room: using inter-disciplinary concepts to supplement courses.

Presenter: Jim Loos, Jim Stick (DMACC)
Offered: Session 2; Session 4
Panel will talk about how they use interdisciplinary concepts to help students understand concepts in courses they have taught. Time will be allotted for questions from and comments by panelists and attendees.

Development of Curriculum and Lab Activities for CTE Programs

Presenter: Scott Ocken and Jenny Foster (DMACC)
Offered: Session 1
This session will focus on updating competencies to reflect industry standards, developing strategiv lab activities, and it will include examples of how to assess student performance in the lab.

Grins, Gripes, and Groups: The Theory and Practice of Small Group Instruction

Presenter: Lee Weber (UNI)
Offered: Session 1; Session 2
This workshop is designed to examine the special peculiarities of small group instruction, and how it differs so dramatically from full class instruction and/or individual assignments. The workshop is presented in SMALL GROUP fashion, with participants experiencing all the activities in both small group discussion format, as well as in full class presentation.

Kognito At-Risk Training

Presenter: Landi Smith andother Counselor TBD (DMACC)
Offered: Session 2; Session 4
Do you want to feel more confident to help those students that you worry about? Kognito At-Risk is an online training that allows you to learn through practice conversations with student avatars. You will learn how to identify signs of psychological distress and techniques to approach and motivate students to access help. DMACC faculty and staff have given very positive feedback about this training! Counselors will be present to answer your questions and to present the resources available at DMACC and in our community to support our students.

Leadership Excellence at DMACC (LEAD)

Presenter: Chris Moon and Connie Sanderson (DMACC)
Offered: Session 3; Session 4
Leadership Excellence At DMACC is a pilot program started Fall of 2014 with a mission to integrate employability skills and technical skills into DMACC courses. The pilot, a partnership with the Ray Center, IEE, and DMACC provides curriculum for several current courses and STEM Initiatives. Join the LEAD faculty to learn about this exciting addition to arming our students with skills for the workplace.

Lit Review of Teaching and Learning at Community College

Presenter: Laurie Linhart (DMACC)
Offered: Session 2; Session 4
I wish I had time to read journal articles and books about teaching and learning communities at the community college, but I'm always in the classroom or grading." If this sounds familiar, join us for a review and discussion of the recent literature published in peer reviewed journals and books relevant to teaching and learning at the community college. Participants will walk away with an annotated bibliography and the latest information on best practices.

Making Accounting Relevant for the Non-Accounting Major

Presenter: Brian Sweeney (Kaplan University)
Offered: Session 4
Many students who are no pursuing and Accounting major don't have a clear understanding on why Accounting classes are required for their Business major. This presentation explores why basic accounting knowledge is useful for any degreed business person and some strategies for explaining the importance of Accounting to students who may resist the idea of studying Accounting.

Making Successful Transitions: How High School Students Become Effective College Learners.

Presenter: Leonard Geddes (Keynote)
Offered: Session 1; Session 2
Students often have difficulty transitioning from the teacher-centered K-12 environment to the more learner-centric environment of higher education. This interactive session uses video, visuals and tools to provide participants clarity on the issues that must be resolved if students are to become successful college students.

Mathematical Literacy- Making Connections between Reading Comprehension and Math Aptitude

Presenter: Bruce Linkvis (William Penn)
Offered: Session 1; Session 3
This session will introduce and explore the idea of the connection between reading comprehension and math aptitude through the use of novels in the mathematics classroom. Demonstration of some examples will be included and participant involvement highly encouraged.

New Initiatives at DMACC: Launching an Exclusive Professional Growth Program for Adjunct Faculty

Presenter: Anna Conway (DMACC)
Offered: Session 3
In the spring of 2016 DMACC launched a pilot between adjunct faculty members at 2 DMACC campuses. This fall DMACC will start the adjunct program district wide. This session will present details of the program as well as current research about adjunct faculty in institutions of higher learning.

Process and Product: Using a Linked Assignment Sequence in Composition

Presenter: Ann McBee (DMACC)
Offered: Session 1
Short presentation on how to use an assignment sequence in which all graded major assignments link to one another, which aids not only in helping students see writing as a process as well as a product, but also creates time for them to develop ideas and do more thoughtful research. Teacher can benefit from ease and efficiency in planning a semester-long sequence that can be catered to the needs of their distinct themes and texts.

PSY 111: Making the most of Wiley Plus

Presenter: Katherine Dowdell & Tiffany Thomas (DMACC)
Offered: Session 4
Come explore the new features of Wiley Plus and learn how to use the system to enhance learning, improve exam scores and motivate your students!

PSY Course Structure and Standards: Best practices in course design

Presenter: Katherine Dowdell & Tiffany Thomas (DMACC)
Offered: Session 2
What should a well-structured psychology course look like? What's the right balance of tests, discussions, activities and assignments? How can we best utilize online course components in a web-enhanced or web-blended format? Join your PSY colleagues to discuss best practices in course design.

PSY Round Table Workshop

Presenter: Katherine Dowdell, Tiffany Thomas, Kate Halverson, Kate Burrell (DMACC)
Offered: Session 3
In this interactive workshop, participants will choose course-specific groups to discuss psychology teaching ideas and resources. Discussions will be determined by participant interest, but may include developmental, abnormal, and introduction to psychology, as well as f3f and online formats.

PSY: Teaching Strategies for Student Engagement

Presenter: Katherine Dowdell, Tiffany Thomas, Kate Halverson, Kate Burrell (DMACC)
Offered: Session 1
In this two part presentation PSY Faculty will share some of their most successful strategies for student engagement and participants will have the opportunity to discuss their own best practices in small groups for the PSY course they teach.

Reflecting, Rethinking, and Rebuilding Online Courses Using the Online Rubric

Presenter: Shannon McGregor (DMACC)
Offered: Session 4
In online learning groups, we have been discussing way to transform online courses, adding one new model practice at a time to improve how we interact and teach online. The primary guide we are using in the process adapts California State University-Chico's Online Course Assessment Rubric to fit DMACC's needs. This session introduces faculty to the online rubric and demonstrates how they can use the rubric to change their online teaching and learning practices. During the session, participants will see the rubric with examples and will learn more about earning TIs for redeveloping their own courses with a liaison and instructional designers.

Strategies for Collaborative Writing: Peer Critique, Iterative Writing and Authenticity

Presenter: Bender, Bovenmeyer, and Madeka (ISU)
Offered: Session 2
With college enrollments on the rise and large classes becoming the norm, instructors find themselves struggling to balance their desire to build students’ writing skills with the workload of correcting and grading. This presentation outlines several strategies adopted in a graduate course at Iowa State University to foster effective writing without increasing the instructor load. Aided by the technology platform called ThinkSpace, the presenters are able to implement strategies to overcome writer’s block, leverage the power of peer critique, expert feedback and the refinement gained through the iterative writing process. These are done in authentic settings in collaborative environments using team based learning, small groups and flipped classrooms. This process of learning is engaging for the students, showing marked improvements in outcomes, and is enjoyable for the instructors who see learning unfold before their eyes.

Student Engagement CTE Style

Presenter: Scott Ocken and Jenny Foster (DMACC)
Offered: Session 4
The hot topic of the day is: How can we motivate students sto engage and perform? In this session we will have a discussion that will give you a jump start on having students talking about your course as if it is the best thing they have ever done. As a side note, we will also discuss how to deal with students who don't want to leave when class is over. Imagine students who can't get enough of what you have to teach, and how good that will make you feel as a teacher. We believe that every steacher should love to come to work, and great student engagement is the first and most important step to making this a reality.

Student Persistence to Program Completion: An Ethnograpic Analysis

Presenter: Laurie Linhart (DMACC)
Offered: Session 1; Session 3
Preliminary findings from the ongoing research on student completion at DMACC will be presented in this session. Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews are underway with two cohorts of students from Ankeny campus (Fall 2015 and Spring 2016), faculty from the Ankeny campus (adjunct and full time), student support services staff from the Ankeny campus and administration district wide. The goal of the research is to further the understanding of the culture of persistence in order to develop clear data driven strategies

Talk Saves Lives: Suicide Prevention at DMACC

Presenter: Landi Smith and DMACC Counselors (DMACC)
Offered: Session 1; Session 3
Presentation will cover the general scope of suicide and the research on prevention. Attendees will learn the risk factors and warning signs of suicide and how they can make a difference to someone at risk. Counselors will highlight resources available at DMACC to support concerned faculty and the at risk individual. Time will be allotted for sharing and discussion amongst colleagues.

The many COLORS of Teaching (Double Session)

Presenter: Buzz Hoffman (DMACC)
Offered: Session 1; Session 2; Session 3; Session 4
Come join the FUN as you explore how colorful teaching can be. You will have the opportunity to discover the unique COLORS that explain your individual personality and develop an awareness of how this drives your teaching style. You will explore the many "colorful" personalities that students bring to your classroom and how this affects their learning. Teaching strategies for reaching various learning styles will be discussed as we work to be more effective in the classroom.

Tips from the Trenches

Presenter: Glenn Steimling (William Penn University)
Offered: Session 1; Session 3; Session 4
Traditional 'lectures' are passé; today's students expect (demand?) more engagement in the classroom than passively listening to a 'prof pontificating from a podium.' From strategies for enlivening topic introduction and theory discussions to activities for individual and small group facilitation and application of concepts, I'll open my toolbox of classroom tested learning practices. With many years of teaching experiences I've amassed many unique and innovative pedagogical activities to increase student participation and mastery of academic principles/fundamentals. I will present some experiential learning activities I use in my classes that may be appropriate for small schools/low classroom numbers as well as ideas for assignments that offer real world components.

Transforming Information into Knowledge Creating Student Success

Presenter: Todd Behrends (DMACC)
Offered: Session 2; Session 4
Course outcomes include learning objectives and practical application of information. Working with diverse sets of student backgrounds, academic concepts appear different when the scholarly works are partnered with practical applications of concepts. "Seek first to understand in order to be understood," Aristotle said. It's the precept that assimilates a 400 page text so students achieve educational, personal and professional goals. Using discussion, projects, career experiences, guest speakers, field trips and technology to help make the textbook come "alive" we connect academia with student career and personal goals. Join me for the journey as we use the text as a map to chart a course that applies tried and true academic principles with student professional and personal goals to achieve critical thinking skills, happiness and success.

Unpacking the Layers: Teaching Analysis

Presenter: Sarah Brown-Wessling (Keynote)
Offered: Session 4
If you've found yourself asking, "How do I get my students to see beyond the surface when they read?" you're part of a huge club of us who are constantly trying to help our readers "get beyond." Great readers and great thinkers are usually interchangeable, so it only makes sense that in working to cultivate stronger readers we must simultaneously work to cultivate stronger thinkers. In the session, we'll break down a process for teaching analysis and then look at how to transfer it to all kinds of texts and disciplines.

Using Assessment to Improve Teaching.

Presenter: Chelli Gentry (DMACC)
Offered: Session 2
This presentation by Chelli Gentry the Director of Assessment at DMACC will talk about a variety of Assessment processes designed to help teachers teach and students learn.

Using Beers and Probst's Notice and Note Stances to develop Rogerian Argument Essays.

Presenter: Jeff Hughes (DMACC)
Offered: Session 3
Kylene Beers and Robert E Probst's book, Reading Nonfiction: Notice and Note Stances, Signposts and Strategies, provides several excellent tools for helping students mine meaning in nonfiction sources. I have adapted these approaches for the PSY 111 "Introduction to Psychology" course. I will share examples of ways Notice and Notesignposting and content frames can help students explore essential questions in areas like "What is Consciousness?," "How are Animal and Human Intelligences Different?" and "Is Justice Subjective and Morally Relative?"

Using Kaltura to Create, Host and Assess Video Content

Presenter: Dan Petrak (DMACC)
Offered: Session 1; Session 2; Session 3; Session 4
This hands on session is intended for DMACC faculty currently using Blackboard. The participants will learn and use the basic features of Kaltura to create, host and share a short video in Blackboard. In addition, training will be provided on using the embedded quizzing feature to assess learning. Participants will be encouraged to share best practices and ideas on how to effectively create and use video in their online and face-to-face classes.

Using Technology to connect here, there and everywhere.

Presenter: Linda Parker (William Penn University)
Offered: Session 1
William Penn University has taken a unique approach to both the need for technology in the classroom and the flexibility needed for students working while going to school. The presentation will review some of those.

Web Enhancing Your Instruction in CTE Programs

Presenter: Scott Ocken and Jenny Foster (DMACC)
Offered: Session 3
This discussion and demonstration will help you decide what you can do to web enhance your course and facilitate moving course information to a Blackboard platform. We will also use Blackboard Community to help share information and experiences with other faculty.

What's new with your Library?? EVERYTHING!

Presenter: Rebecca Funke and Lindsay Healey (DMACC)
Offered: Session 1; Session 2; Session 3; Session 4
The DMACC Libraries have moved to a new electronic platform and interface. Find articles, books and videos with a single search! Users will discover new resources, place Holds on DMACC books directly from the catalog and request items from other libraries across the country, via InterLibrary Loan. Best of all, your students will have access to library resources by logging in with their DMACC username and password!!