Nearly 100 DMACC Nursing Students Graduate Following the Fall 2020 Semester

Posted 12/23/2020
Two nursing students

Despite the Pandemic, DMACC Fall Semester Graduation Rates Remain Consistent from Previous Fall Semesters

  • A total of 35 nursing students graduate from the DMACC Ankeny Campus, 23 from the Urban Campus, and 20 each from the Boone and Newton Campuses, respectively, during the fall semester.

  • “Nursing and other health career students seem to be enthusiastically entering the profession,” according to DMACC’s Health and Public Services Dean.

  • “DMACC nursing graduates want to make a difference in providing quality healthcare to Iowans,” said DMACC’s Interim Nursing Education Director.

  • DMACC’s nursing enrollment is at maximum capacity.

A total of 98 nursing students graduated from DMACC following the Fall 2020 semester and will be entering the workforce during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Virtual DMACC nursing graduation ceremonies were recently held in which 35 DMACC Ankeny Campus nursing students graduated, 23 graduated from the Urban Campus and 20 more each from the Boone and Newton Campuses.

Those numbers are consistent with DMACC nursing graduation rates from previous fall semesters. DMACC Health and Public Services Dean Dr. Arthur Brown said DMACC’s nursing enrollment is at maximum capacity. There are approximately 450 students enrolled in DMACC’s nursing program districtwide.

Even with the challenges of COVID, Brown said nursing and other health career students seem to be enthusiastically entering the profession.

“As for our current students and recent graduates, I am finding our students are extremely motivated to enter the workforce and begin the fight against COVID,” Brown said.

DMACC nursing students are called to the nursing profession for many reasons. DMACC District Coordinator-Nursing and Interim Nursing Education Director Dr. Natalia Thilges said among​ those reasons, one of the most commonly shared by DMACC nursing students entering the program is that they wish to make a difference in the lives of their patients and their families by delivery of safe, quality and compassionate care.

“During the COVID crisis, many students have continued to work in healthcare above and beyond hours which they were hired to work, while at the same time learning to flourish in a world environment that many days seemed to be rapidly changing, to stay on target for graduation and seamless entry into practice,” Thilges said. “DMACC nursing graduates look forward to working with nurses already in practice to make a difference in providing quality healthcare to Iowans.”

Return to News