DMACC -Urban Campus
Computer Information Systems
  Marv Gardner - MIS Degree Program Chair
Office UC01 # 226 Phone: (515)248-7500 E-mail mlgardner@dmacc.edu

NEW  -  Informatics Courses at DMACC

What Is Informatics?

What are the Career Opportunities in Informatics?

DMACC’s existing curriculum in computer technology primarily focuses on computer programming, databases and networking. The United States Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics states that employment of computer and information systems managers, a field that major colleges and universities define as “Informatics” is expected to grow 17 percent over the 2008-2018 decade, which is faster than the average for all occupations. New applications of technology in the workplace will continue to drive demand for workers, fueling the need for more managers.

Informatics specialists provide technical assistance, support, and advice to individuals and organizations that depend on information technology. They work within organizations that use computer systems, for computer hardware or software vendors, or for third-party organizations that provide support services on a contract basis. Entry-level specialists generally work directly with customers or in-house users. They may advance into positions that handle products or problems with higher levels of technical complexity. They often advance into management roles.

DMACC:    Informatics Certificate        Mangement Information Degree Informatics Track

Accounting Information Systems Informatics Track



Entry Level Earnings

Median annual wages of wage-and-salary computer support specialists were $43,450 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $33,680 and $55,990. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $26,580, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $70,750. Median annual wages in the industries employing the largest numbers of computer support specialists in May 2008 were as follows:

Professional and commercial equipment and supplies merchant wholesalers

$48,580

Management of companies and enterprises

45,200

Colleges, universities, and professional schools

43,130

Computer systems design and related services

43,080

Elementary and secondary schools

40,550

A college degree is required for some computer support specialist positions, but an associate degree or certification may be sufficient for others. Strong problem-solving and communication skills are essential.

Management Level Earnings

Wages of computer and information systems managers vary by specialty and level of responsibility. Median annual wages of these managers in May 2008 were $112,210. The middle 50 percent earned between $88,240 and $141,890. Median annual wages in the industries employing the largest numbers of computer and information systems managers in May 2008 were as follows:

Software publishers

$126,840

Computer systems design and related services

118,120

Management of companies and enterprises

115,150

Depository credit intermediation

113,380

Insurance carriers

109,810

In addition to salaries, computer and information systems managers, especially those at higher levels, often receive employment-related benefits, such as expense accounts, stock option plans, and bonuses.

A bachelor's degree in a computer-related field usually is required for management positions, although employers often prefer a graduate degree, especially an MBA with technology as a core component. Common majors for undergraduate degrees are computer science, information science, or management information systems (MIS).